The Awards Season Round-Up 2016

Movie previews, Movie reviews

Hello Hello Hello!

Welcome to the last (finally) post dedicated to the awards’ season. This time, I won’t be reviewing any nominated motion pictures (I have done that already), but I  will tell you my own personal winners and will list all the others films in a very subjective order in each category. I am listing all the films because it was very hard for me to pick a definite number 1 spot. In addition, a lot of these films would have probably made my Best movies of 2015 list if I had seen them before January 1st, so I feel the need to at least mention them here.

Now, my categories won’t have a definite number of spaces in them. I have actually picked 20 films in total that have been nominated for either a Golden Globe, a SAG, a BAFTA, an Oscar or for all 4.  Also, I will be joining adapted and original screenplay categories into one. The distinction between lead and supporting roles will also be treated subjectively and not necessarily the way that the studios wanted. At the end of each category, I will also give my more objective prediction of who will probably take home the Academy Award.

P.S. The reviews of all these movies are linked to the names of the films only once – in the first category because it just seemed irrational to link you to a single post 5 or 6 times.

Best Picture

  1. Mad Max: Fury Road
  2. The Revenant
  3. The Martian
  4. Spotlight
  5. Creed
  6. The Big Short
  7. The Hateful Eight
  8. Steve Jobs
  9. Room
  10. The Danish Girl
  11. Bridge of Spies
  12. Brooklyn
  13. Ex-Machina
  14. Concussion
  15. Joy
  16. Straight Outta Compton
  17. Trumbo
  18. Beasts of No Nation
  19. Carol
  20. 45 Years

Prediction: As much as I would love for Mad Max to get the win, it seems very unlikely that this will happen. Although, with all the backlash against the Oscars online, the Academy might want to calm the fanboys/fangirls down by giving the award to the fan favorite. If they do decide to go the traditional route, The Revenant will probably be their top pick.

Best Directing

  1. Mad Max: Fury Road – George Miller
  2. The Revenant – Alejandro González Iñárritu
  3. The Hateful Eight – Quentin Tarantino 
  4. Room –  Lenny Abrahamson
  5. The Big Short – Adam McKay
  6. Creed – Ryan Coogler 
  7. Beasts of No Nation – Cary Joji Fukunaga
  8. Bridge of Spies – Steven Spielberg 
  9. Straight Outta Compton – F. Gary Gray
  10. The Martian – Ridley Scott
  11. Steve Jobs – Danny Boyle
  12. Ex-Machina – Alex Garland
  13. Spotlight – Tom McCarthy
  14. Concussion –  Peter Landesman
  15. The Danish Girl – Tom Hooper
  16. Brooklyn – John Crowley
  17. Trumbo – Jay Roach
  18. Joy – David O. Russell
  19. Carol – Todd Haynes
  20. 45 Years – Andrew Haigh

Prediction: Again, I would love for George Miller to take the award home, but I kinda think that Iñárritu will get his second win in the row. I would be willing to let Iñárritu win if Mad Max gets the Best Picture statue.

Best Writing

  1. Spotlight – Tom McCarthy, Josh Singer
  2. The Hateful Eight – Quentin Tarantino
  3. Steve Jobs – Aaron Sorkin
  4. The Martian – Drew Goddard
  5. Creed – Ryan Coogler, Aaron Covington
  6. The Big Short – Adam McKay, Charles Randolph
  7. The Revenant – Mark L. Smith, Alejandro G. Iñárritu
  8. Mad Max: Fury Road – George Miller, Brendan McCarthy, Nico Lathouris
  9. Bridge of Spies – Matt Charman, Joel Coen, Ethan Coen
  10. Straight Outta Compton – Jonathan Herman, Andrea Berloff
  11. Ex-Machina – Alex Garland
  12. The Danish Girl – Lucinda Coxon
  13. Room – Emma Donoghue
  14. Trumbo – John McNamara
  15. Concussion – Peter Landesman
  16. Joy – David O. Russell
  17. 45 Years – Andrew Haigh
  18. Beasts of No Nation – Cary Joji Fukunaga
  19. Brooklyn – Nick Hornby
  20. Carol – Phyllis Nagy

Prediction: this is the hardest category to predict. My best bet is that the original screenplay statue will be awarded to Spotlight, while the adapted one – to The Big Short.

Best Male Performance in a Leading Role:

  1. Leonardo Dicaprio for The Revenant
  2. Eddie Redmayne for The Danish Girl
  3. Tom Hardy for The Revenant and Mad Max: Fury Road
  4. Matt Damon for The Martian
  5. Jacob Tremblay for Room
  6. Michael Fassbender for Steve Jobs
  7. Samuel L. Jackson for The Hateful Eight
  8. Michael B.Jordan for Creed
  9. Will Smith for  Concussion
  10. Bryan Cranston for Trumbo
  11. Tom Hanks for Bridge of Spies
  12. Christian Bale for The Big Short
  13. Mark Ruffalo for Spotlight
  14. Domhnall Gleeson for Ex Machina
  15. Abraham Attah for Beasts of No Nation
  16. O’Shea Jakcson Jr. for Straight Outta Compton
  17. Tom Courtenay for 45 Years

Prediction: this is one of the few categories where my objective and subjective side think the same thing. If Leo does not win this year, he should just stop trying altogether.

Best Female Performance in a Leading Role:

  1. Brie Larson for Room
  2. Alicia Vikander for The Danish Girl and Ex-Machina
  3. Charlize Theron for Mad Max Fury Road
  4. Rooney Mara for Carol
  5. Jennifer Lawrence for Joy
  6. Rachel McAdams for Spotlight
  7. Cate Blanchett for Carol
  8. Saoirse Ronan for Brooklyn
  9. Charlotte Rampling for 45 Years

Prediction: once again, I both objectively and subjectively think that Brie Larson should get the Oscar, although, I would be pleasantly surprised if Vikander gets the win. On a side note, the saddest part about this category is that out of the 20 films, I could only find 9 actresses in  leading(-ish) roles, while there 17 male leading roles.

Best Male Performance in a Supporting Role:

  1. Ryan Gosling for The Big Short
  2. Mark Rylance for Bridge of Spies
  3. Sylvester Stallone for Creed
  4. Nicholas Hoult for Mad Max Fury Road
  5. Domhnall Gleeson for The Revenant
  6. Bradley Cooper for Joy
  7. Idris Elba for Beasts of No Nation
  8. Oscar Isaac for Ex-Machina
  9. Matthias Schoenaerts for The Danish Girl
  10. Walton Goggins for The Hateful Eight
  11. Michael Keaton for Spotlight
  12. Alec Baldwin for Concussion
  13. Corey Hawkins for Straight Outta Compton

Prediction: while I would like Gosling to win, I think that the award will go to either Mark Rylance or Sylvester Stallone. I wouldn’t be sad in either case.

Best Female Performance in a Supporting Role

  1. Kate Winslet for Steve Jobs
  2. Jennifer Jason Leight for The Hateful Eight
  3. Jessica Chastain for The Martian
  4. Tessa Thompson for Creed
  5. Amber Heard for The Danish Girl
  6. Gugu Mbatha-Raw for Concussion
  7. Diane Lane for Trumbo

Prediction: I would like the win to go to Kate Winslet, but the actual award will probably find itself in the hands of Jennifer Jason Leight. On a side note, this was probably the hardest category to fill, because I put a lot of actresses in the leading role category, while the Academy and the studios said that they were playing supporting roles.

I really hope that you enjoyed this post because I worked really hard on it. I felt the most challenged not when I was compiling the actual final lists, but while I was watching and reviewing all the films. Tell me in the comments your personal winners! Bye!!

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5 ideas about 5 movies

Movie reviews

Good morning my dear readers!

In a few days, I will be posting a really long blog post dedicated to the awards’ season. It will be my final post on this topic. Differently from the actual voting system, I will be telling you not only my own personal winners in all the major categories, but I will list all the other films as well. So, you will be able to know my subjective runner-ups and losers. I am mainly doing it this way because 1.it is more of a challenge and I like a cinematic challenge; 2.the majority of these films would have made it into my Best movies of 2015 list but didn’t because I haven’t seen them before January 1st.

In addition, my categories will be very broad – I am picking films that have been nominated for a variety of awards and not just the Oscars. I have rounded up my list to 20 films – 15 of them have been reviewed separately, but I hadn’t given you my thoughts on the rest 5. So, this is where this post starts to make sense – I will give you my brief opinion on the 5 films that I didn’t review before. I am doing 5 reviews in one because I don’t have time to write separate posts for each and every one of these motion pictures. Also, I feel like this type of reviewing (a few reviews in a single post) is a nice callback to my older style of reviewing, when I was just starting to write about films.

So, without further rambling, let’s talk about Concussion, 45 years, Beasts of No nation, Ex-Machina and Straight Outta Compton.

Concussion: directed and written by Peter Landesman (only his 2nd feature film) and starring Will Smith, Concussion, to me, was the biggest snub at the awards’ season. Not only did Will Smith should have received a Best Actors nomination (it was his best performance I have seen in years – his emotional expressions were amazing and the weird accent was, surprisingly, really authentic), but Landesman also deserved to get the Best-Adapted Screenplay nomination. As a fan of sports and movies about sports, I was pleased with Concussion, as it helped me to get one step closer to understanding American football. If you want to watch a few other films, starring Will Smith, may I suggest The Pursuit of Happyness. If you want something lighter in tone and something newer, check out Focus. His and Margo Robbie’s chemistry is amazing in that film – I can’t wait to see both of them in Suicide Squad. Rate: 4.5/5, trailer.

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45 Years: this movie was the last film I watched this awards’ season. It was slow yet nice love story, written and directed by a brit Andrew Haigh.  Two silver screen veterans Charlotte Rampling and Tom Courtenay did subtle and nuanced performances, but I, personally, couldn’t connect with the film, as the subject matter (the 45th wedding anniversary) was so far out of my reach. Nevertheless, the timeless values like love, loyalty, and honesty were portrayed clearly. Rate: 3.5/5, trailer.

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Beasts of No Nation: to begin with, I applaud the creators of this film for being modern and releasing this film digitally (on Netflix). The majority of the Hollywood filmmakers are still against the phenomena of digital release, and while I do understand their worries and concerns, I nonetheless think that they should (at least) try to adapt to the changes if they want to stay relevant. Speaking about the actual film, it was  written, shot, and directed by Cary Joji Fukunaga. Why he didn’t get more recognition from the critics and other awards’ voters is beyond me, as he did a spectacular job. Never have I been shocked by a film as much as I was appalled and astonished by Beasts of No Nation. It was both very eye-opening to the cruelty of the contemporary world and sad because of the role that children have in war. The dream/drug sequence was a visual feast (those colors were indescribable) and the performances of the lead Ghanaian young actor Abraham Attah as well as Idris Elba in a supporting role were breathtaking. Rate: 4/5, trailer.

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Ex-Machina: A very early 2015 release, Alex Garland’s Ex-Machina slipped my attention while I was compiling my best movies of 2015 list, so I was really happy that the Academy didn’t repeat my mistake because this film deserves all the recognition. It was an amazing and original sci-fi motion picture in a year of shitty sequels and reboots – basically, this film was the savior of all the science fiction fans last year. Ex-Machina was also a great example that a great filmmaker doesn’t need a huge budget to make an amazing film. Newcomer Alex Garland mixed his artistic vision with scientific imagination and created a movie that can be viewed both as a mainstream sci-fi flick and as a serious film that raises deep existential questions. Lastly, the up-and-coming trio of Domhnall Gleeson, Alicia Vikander and Oscar Isaac also should be praised for their stellar performances. During 2015, all of these actors not only appeared on my radar but quickly found themselves in my personal best actors list. Vikander blew me away in The Danish Girl, The Man from U.N.C.L.E., Testament of Youth and in an older film that I have only watched this year – Anna Karenina, Gleeson appeared in a bunch of films this year, most importantly, The Revenant and Isaac was the fan-favorite and one of my personal favorites in the new Star Wars. Can’t wait to see what these actors will do next with their careers, as I will be following them closely. Rate: 5/5, trailer.

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Straight Outta Compton: the biggest surprise of the summer, Straight Outta Compton was the movie that I skipped when it was first released, and only watched when it started to get some recognition from the critics. As someone who never liked rap music and who knows nothing about the black culture, I thought that I wouldn’t particularly care about this film. I was so so wrong. Director Felix Gary Gray, who is set to direct Fast and Furious 8, and a cast of newcomer actors made me interested in the subject and made me the characters that I could never identify with. That’ an example of true filmmaking. Rate: 4/5, trailer.

Straight_Outta_Compton_poster

 

5 ideas about a movie: The Danish Girl

Movie reviews

Hello!

I have been reviewing movies for over 2 years now and I have never before felt afraid to review a film. Well, that was until now. The Danish Girl tells a story of one of the first gender reassignment operations in the world. Sadly, even after all these years, this topic is still highly controversial and dividing. I, personally, believe that all people have a right to be themselves. However, I do not know enough about transgender issues to talk about them (for example, which pronouns are to be used). Thus, I am scared that I will offend someone because of my ignorance, while reviewing this film. Nevertheless, I will try to do my best and I only ask you to be patient and tolerant with me, while I try to handle this difficult and delicate topic and film.

IMDb summary: A fictitious love story loosely inspired by the lives of Danish artists Lili Elbe and Gerda Wegener. Lili and Gerda’s marriage and work evolve as they navigate Lili’s groundbreaking journey as a transgender pioneer.

SPOILERS!

  1. The Danish Girl is a semi-fictional and semi-autobiographical story. It first came to life in a book form, written by David Ebershoff. Later, it was adapted into a motion picture, using playwright’s and screenwriter’s Lucinda Coxon’s script. I don’t know how much the narrative has changed when adapting it from textual to the visual medium, but I believe that Coxon did justice to the story. The two main characters were developed slowly and carefully (the end result was really good). In addition, the scarf metaphor at the end of the film was a nice touch. Overall, the movie was very sad but also somewhat hopeful – it is such a cliche thing to say but it is true. Although, Lili died, she died being herself, her true self and that’s the only thing we can all wish for – being able to find our true selves before our time runs out. I,personally, still have lots of looking to do.
  2. The film was directed by Tom Hooper, whose past few films I really enjoyed – The King’s Speech and Les Miserables. While there weren’t many significant shots or anything too surprising in the film coming from Hooper, I applaud him for kinda stepping back and allowing the story to unfold organically. Sometimes, it is even harder to do that than to be really hands on. Nonetheless, I did like the shots with the manually shifting focus – those are always a win for me. I liked the soft pallet of the film as well. Lastly, slight warning – this film does contain quite a lot of nudity, so beware of this, if that somehow bothers you.
  3. Eddie Redmayne was unbelievably amazing both as Einar and Lili. The quivering, tiny movements of the face and the hands portrayed the inner chaos of his character perfectly. I give highest praises to Redmayne for not only giving us this amazing performance but for being brave enough to take on this immensely difficult role in the first place. I can’t imagine a different actor playing Einar/Lili. If I did not want Leonardo DiCaprio to finally win an Oscar for The Revenant, I would a 100% give it to Redmayne for the 2nd year in a row. His physical and mental transformation in The Theory of Everything was amazing to watch, but he upped his game even more in The Danish Girl. If not for Jupiter Ascending, 2015 would have been an absolutely groundbreaking year for Redmayne’s career. I can’t wait for November to come because we will see him in a Harry Potter universe film – Fantastic Beasts and Where To Find Them.
  4. Alicia Vikander also did a magnificent job and proved us all (for like the 3rd time this year) that she is the one to look out for. She portrayed Gerda impeccability and you could see the inner process of her mind (denying at first and them coming to acceptance) on her face in a variety of different emotions. A few of the films, starring Vikander that I have reviewed are The Man from U.N.C.L.E., Anna Karenina, and Testament of Youth. She was also wonderful in Ex Machina and in a tiny role in Burnt. In 2016, we will see Vikander in Tulip FeverThe Light Between Oceans and in a yet untitled 5th Bourne film.
  5. The supporting cast of the film also had a few familiar faces who did a very nice job. Ben Whishaw (Suffragette, Spectre, In The Heart of The Seaplayed another LGBTQ character in a time, when being gay was unacceptable and was a great support for Lili (not at first, but in the end). Matthias Schoenaerts (Far from the Madding Crowd) played a supporting character in Vikander’s Gerda’s plot-line. Lastly, Amber Heard (Magic Mike XXL) starred as a family friend, while Sebastian Koch (Bridge of Spies) played the doctor.

In short, The Danish Girl was an interesting film with stellar performances from the up-and-coming cast. I hope that the film helps to bring the issues of the transgender community to the forefront even more and I do believe that the positive change will happen in a near future.

Rate: 4,5/5

Trailer: The Danish Girl trailer

Movie review: Suffragette

Movie reviews

Hello!

One of the good things about living in the UK is getting British films early. However, nowadays, finding time to review them is pretty problematic. So, in honor of Suffragette’s limited release in the US (a week later), let’s review it!

IMDb summary: The foot soldiers of the early feminist movement, women who were forced underground to pursue a dangerous game of cat and mouse with an increasingly brutal State.

Feelings

Personally, I get really angry when watching movies about minority rights. Although, I should not call women a minority, since we inhabit half of the world. Anyway, Suffragette, like 12 Years a Slave, Mandela: A Long Walk to Freedom, The Butler, and a plethora of other movies, angered me in a good kind of way – in a way that makes you want to do something with your life and change the world for the better. For this reason, I believe that everyone should watch Suffragette. In addition, I appreciate movie industry’s efforts to bring important issues to the forefront. How many people would actually research historical facts themselves? But when you put the same story into a visual media format, it instantly gets more attention.

Story&Writing

The film’s script was written by Abi Morgan – a British playwright and screenwriter. I have not seen her previous films, but would love to check them out someday, when I have time to do that. I believe that she did justice to this story. I would like to discuss a few plot points:

  1. The thing that really added a lot of flame into my overall angry/inspired physiological state after watching the film was the male characters. And not the ones who were actual douche bags. The main character’s husband was a terrible person. He acted like a victim and then just gave his son away. Even the detective, who was trying to stop Suffragette movement was a more likable character since he at least could justify his actions by saying that he was only trying to enforce the law (though, the law was definitely wrong that time). But the husband, who should have been supportive, was a complete disappointment. The film did a great job of reversing the roles of male characters and playing upon the viewers’ (or at least my) expectations.
  2. The movie also portrayed the fact that not all women wanted to fight for the cause. And while I disagree with their decision, I still believe that they were entitled to choose. I have already explained to you that I believe in feminism (contemporary way of fighting for women’s rights) as a choice when I reviewed Cinderella. Also, I have recently studied lots of fairy-tales in my English course at university and definitely realized that these stories are not as black and white as one might think.
  3. I loved how the film portrayed Suffragettes as a group. Although the movie focused a lot on one individual, you could still sense that she was a part of something bigger.
  4. Lastly, the end credits included the list of historical dates when women received voting rights in various countries. And sadly, some of the dates were not past but present ones. This just shows that the fight is not over and we have a long way to go. The film’s narrative also portrayed the idea of a long fight: the film was set in 1912 and the actual voting rights in the UK were received only in 1918 (partly) and in 1928 (fully). Other countries established equal voting even later.

Directing&Visuals

Suffragette was directed by Sarah Gavron who had her start making documentaries and later transitioned into narrative films. It is not really surprising that this film was made by a female director since it tackles women’s issues. However, I am really happy that it was directed by a woman, because I do not think that a male voice could have brought this story to live in a proper way. Although, I am not the kind of movie goer who pays a lot of attention to gender, race or skin color of a director, screenwriter or an actor and I believe in absolute equality, I still think that some individuals can tackle some issues better than others. I love how I contradict myself in the same sentence. Eh, what the heck: we can have ‘to each their own’ and ‘everything to all’ in the 21st century.

Talking about the visual aspects of the film, I have to admit that I did not really noticed them since the narrative was so strong. It overpowered both the Mise-En-Scene and Cinematography or it would be better to say that all three elements worked in perfect unison to create a flawless continuity. On a side note, some scenes for the film were filmed in the actual Houses of Parliament! 

Acting

  • Carey Mulligan as Maud Watts was a great leading lady. Her on-screen transition was simultaneously heartbreaking and empowering. Mulligan did a great job. I am a fan of hers – especially loved her last film – Far From The Madding Crowd – where she also played a strong female in a male world in a slightly different (earlier) period. She has also previously worked with the screenwriter of Suffragette in 2011’s Shame.
  • Helena Bonham Carter as Edith Ellyn was also amazing as one would expect. I became a fan of hers back when she was in Harry Potter films, but I also really loved The King’s Speech, Les Miserables and Alice, which she also has starred in. Interesting fact, according to Wikipedia, Bonham Carter is the great-granddaughter of H. H. Asquith, who served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom in 1908–16, the prime years of the suffrage movement, which he opposed. Great granddaughter is going against her great granddad’s will – props to her.
  • Meryl Streep as Emmeline Pankhurst was also a nice addition to the cast. However, I can definitely understand why a lot of people were angry about the false advertisement. Streep had one scene/speech in the film and one encounter with our main character and while she definitely played an important figure of the movement (the leader), she should not have been put on the poster of the film. I would not even call her a supporting actress in this film, at best it was a cameo appearance.
  • Natalie Press as Emily Davison. Interestingly, I was not familiar with this actress only a few weeks ago, but then we watched the short film Wasp by Andrea Arnold in the film class. I really enjoyed that short movie, which portrayed raw social realism realistically. It was one of Press’s early films and she was great back then and is still a great actress now. She should have had that 3rd spot on the poster because of that spoiler-y reason at the end.
  • The cast also included Anne-Marie Duff as Violet Miller. I loved the contrast between her’s and Mulligan’s characters: one was becoming more fearless and independent, while another had to lose her independence for, again, a spoiler-y reason.
  • The two males of the film, whose stories I have already discussed were played by Brendan Gleeson (the detective) and Ben Whishaw (the husband). Previously, I have only seen Gleeson in Harry Potter films as well as in Edge of Tomorrow and Stonehearts Asylum. He will also star in In the Heart of Sea later this year. Speaking about Whishaw, I am a fan of his since Cloud Atlas, so it was quite weird to not like him as a character because he usually plays very likeable ones. He will also star in In the Heart of Sea, which comes out on Christmas, but we will also see him in Spectre next week. He will also be in The Danish Girl – another quite controversial film, which I can’t wait for. Whishaw sure is having a busy 2015.

All in all, Suffragette was a great movie about an important issue. While it might not be an entertaining film to watch, it is definitely an important one. This historical and, at the same time, very recent story was brought to life by amazing on screen performances and splendid off screen work.

Rate: 4.5/5

Trailer: Suffragette trailer

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Movie review: The Man from U.N.C.L.E.

Movie reviews

Hello!

I went to the cinema too many times this week, so I apologize for a bunch of back-to-back movie reviews. I promise the next post will not be about any film! But for now, let’s review The Man from U.N.C.L.E. – to my mind, one of the better films of this summer.

The Man from U.N.C.L.E. is based on a 1964 TV show with the same name. At first, I was hoping that this film was based on an original idea and only while writing this review I found out that it’s an adaptation of an old TV series. I guess we can’t escape the remake zone anymore…However, while nowadays the word ‘remake’ instantly feels like a bad idea (for example, Fantastic Four), The Man from U.N.C.L.E. is a really solid and enjoyable film.

IMDb summary: In the early 1960s, CIA agent Napoleon Solo and KGB operative Illya Kuryakin participate in a joint mission against a mysterious criminal organization, which is working to proliferate nuclear weapons.

History

As you probably know, I am a huge history buff, so any movie set in the past is an instant favorite of mine. The Man from U.N.C.L.E. is set during the Cold War – the most recent historical event and it deals with the aforementioned war’s biggest problem – the creation of an atomic bomb. I love when movies interweave real-life events and figures into their plots. The idea of making a CIA agent and a KGB agent work together is also brilliant.

Visuals

Since the movie is set in the 1960s, the costumes play a huge part in the film. If the appearance of the characters miss-matches the timeline, the viewers are instantaneously taken out of the movie. Thankfully, that does not happen in this film. All the costumes are spectacular and appropriate to the period. If you have read my post about the fashion exhibition that I’ve recently visited (here), you may know that 1960s fashion is one of my favorites, so this film definitely appealed to me on that level. And even though I am a girl and should have been jealous of the girls for having amazing dresses, I was feeling a huge suit envy, because the men of the film looked dashing. BTW, the scene in a clothing store is very funny – look out for it.

The setting and the architecture were also wonderful. The characters traveled trough a variety of different locations but all of them were unique and interesting in their own way. The final chase scene on a private island had a beautiful scenery as well,

Directing and Writing

This film was directed and written by Guy Ritchie (Lionel Wigram also helped with the script) who directed the latest Sherlock Holmes adaptation and its sequel starring Robert Downey Jr. Ritchie is also making a King Arthur film set to be released in 2016. (Antoine Fuqua’s King Arthur from 2004 is one of my favorite films ever, so I can’t wait for this one as well. On a side note, I’ve already seen Fuqua’s latest film Southpaw, the review of it will be released during the weekend). Speaking about U.N.C.L.E, that film had amazing directing. The shots were heavily stylized, so that definitely made the film stand out from other Hollywood action flicks. While I am not a huge fan of contemporary spy dramas/crime dramas (except Mission Impossible and James Bond), this one, with its historical setting and unique point of you, definitely pleases me. It reminded me a bit of Kingsman The Secret Service (review). That movie had a unique setting and a quirky premise and so did U.N.C.L.E. Both of the films also created their own sub-genre – weird action comedy spy drama. Moreover, while Kingsman had amazing long shots, U.N.C.L.E. had a few unique styles of filming as well. Some scenes looked like they came out straight from a graphic novel, while others reminded me of the actual pages of a comic book with a few different panels appearing on screen. Zoom in/zoom out technique of filming was also present during the final action piece and it looked really cool.

Acting

The main trio of the film was played by Henry Cavill, Armie Hammer, and Alicia Vikander.

Henry Cavill (Superman) is British but plays an American. However, his accent never came through and he killed it in this role. Not only did he look amazing but he felt like James Bond from old movies – efficient and confident womanizer.

Armie Hammer played the Russian agent and although Hammer himself is an American, his great-grandfather had ties with the Soviet Union, so there is a small real-life connection with his role. Armie Hammer was also really great in the role and his chemistry with Cavill was amazing. I hope that this will be the redeeming film for Hammer because he only stared in critical and financial flops these past 5 years (for example, The Lone Ranger). His latest successful film – 2010’s The Social Network. 

Swedish actress Alicia Vikander played the leading lady of the film – a German mechanic (I love when movies switch up gender roles – I like cars too and I am a girl) Gabby who was also a British Spy. The twist involving her character was a surprising one for me. Vikander starred in a plethora of movies this year. in 2015, she played the AI in Ex-Machina (loved that film) and an English writer Vera Brittain in the Testament of Youth – a World War I memoir (review coming soon). She also had roles in 2012’s Anna Karenina (review) and 2014’s terrible adaptation of a great book – Seventh Son. I’ve enjoyed almost all the movie that Vikander started in and I can’t wait to see how her career evolves. She will start in a highly anticipated The Danish Girl alongside recent Oscar winner Eddie Redmayne. That film will probably be nominated for an Oscar, so Vikander might get her big break with critics very soon. However, her mainstream career will also get a boost, because she will be in the 5th Bourne film set to be released next year.

The main villain of the film was played by Australian actress Elizabeth Debicki, who shined in a supporting role in 2013’s The Great Gatsby. She did a nice job playing the villainous Victoria Vinciguerra and Italian actor Luca Calvani starred as her husband.

A few accomplished English actors – Jared Harris and
Hugh Grant – provided their services in supporting roles, while German actors Sylvester Groth and Christian Berkel rounded up the cast.

This film definitely had one of the most diverse casts: Americans, Brits, and Germans were sharing the screen with Italians and a Swedish actress. I love when films include a wide variety of nationalities because Hollywood films are seen all around the world, so they should represent all of their audiences and not just the domestic ones.

All in all, The Man from U.N.C.L.E (which stands for United Network Command for Law and Enforcement) was a pleasant surprise. I didn’t expect to like the movies as much as I did. The plot was interesting, the action and visual effects – pleasing to the eye and the acting – just superb. They definitely left room for a sequel at the end of the film, but I doubt that they will make it because U.N.C.L.E. isn’t doing so great in a box office. But I will have my fingers crossed and you should too.

Rate 4.5/5

Trailer: The Man from U.N.C.L.E. trailer

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