5 ideas about a movie: Every Day

Movie reviews

Hello!

Before watching Avengers: Infinity War, I checked out a smaller YA movie, so that my series of recent YA reviews could continue. This is Every Day!

IMDb summary: A shy teenager falls for someone who transforms into another person every day.

Previous recent YA movies I’ve discussed are linked here: Status Update, Love, Simon, Midnight Sun, Blockers.

  1. After watching a fair few of YA movies recently, I’ve sort of realized that they don’t deserve all of the bad-ish rap that they are getting. Not all YA movies are created equal, similarly to how all other films, which aren’t overtly targeted to a specific demographic, are not all good. And while Every Day isn’t the best picture out there, it is certainly not bad and has some new and modern concepts to offer.
  2. Every Day was written by Jesse Andrews (the author of Me and Earl and the Dying Girl), based on the book of the same name by a well known YA writer David Levithan, and directed by Michael Sucsy (who did 2012’s Rachel McAdams romantic drama The Vow). Its premise was either stupid or genius: stupid in that one needed a lot of suspension of disbelief to take the movie seriously but genius because it led to some neat and very 21st-century topics.
  3. I adored Every Day’s take on the trope of the romantic lead and how they could be literally anyone in this movie. Flipped the genre on its head (do any of my readers listen to The Weekly Planet? If yes, I sincerely hope you got that reference). Anyways, I loved how the movie portrayed both identity and sexuality as fluid and asked whether one falls in love with the inner or outer identity.
  4. From the directing standpoint, the movie was fine. It was slow like the majority of romantic dramas and had some neat pop songs like a lot of young adult teen movies do.
  5. The lead of the film was played by Angourie Rice, who some of you may know from an underappreciated comedy The Nice Guys or Sofia Coppola’s The Beguiled. The different romantic interests were played by a whole bunch of actors, some better known than others, like Spider-Man Homecoming’s Jacob Batalon and Paper Towns’ Justice Smith. Debby Ryan also appeared as a sister of the main character – haven’t seen that actress in a project since forever.

In short, Every Day is a very contemporary YA picture that should be given at least a chance.

Rate: 3.5/5

Trailer: Every Day trailer

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5 ideas about a movie: Midnight Sun

Movie reviews

Hello!

Welcome to a review of another YA movie. This time around, it’s Midnight Sun.

IMDb summary: A 17-year-old girl suffers from a condition that prevents her from being out in the sunlight.

  1. Midnight Sun was written by Eric Kirsten and directed by Scott Speer (whose previous teen dramedy – Status Update – came out only around a month ago). It’s actually a remake of a Japanese film Song to the Sun. Yes, foreign YA movies are joining foreign actioners and thrillers as the second genre that Hollywood loves to reboot. In general, I have noticed that my enjoyment of teen/YA pictures depends as much on their quality as on my personal psychological state when watching them. My state was neutral today, so the movie seemed okay too. I definitely rolled my eyes as many times as I genuinely smiled.
  2. Thematically, this movie was similar to Everything Everything in that both of them had a sick girl in the lead. However, while that movie had a twist that led to a happy ending, Midnight Sun had a ballsier ending closer to that of Me Before You. I swear I watch too many movies cause my reviews are literally just me commenting on movies using other films. Anyways, there were a lot of things to love in the script of this film. The portrayal of teenage life was accurate, while the girl’s awkwardness when talking to her crush – incredibly relatable. It was also awesome to see such an open and loving father-daughter relationship on screen. The ultimate message to live life was either cheesy, inspirational or both.
  3. My two main dislikes in the writing were the fact that the girl’s choice not to tell her boyfriend that she was sick seemed like a cheap trick to build conflict rather than a profound and important decision. Similarly, on the character development front, the movie didn’t practice what it preached. The film’s message was that people shouldn’t be defined by one thing, like a sickness or a sport. However, the movie kinda went against that message because it didn’t give its characters much more than just that one defining feature. The main girl got a dead mom and a passion for music so that’s something, but the guy was just a swimmer. Basically, one more rewrite of the script to flesh out these details might have been beneficial.
  4. Bella Thorne played the lead girl in the film and did a good job. I found her dramatic performance quite believable. She also did a good job with the signing even though I don’t think that her voice is that good. Charlie’s Song was a really a lovely pop track. Rob Riggle was also really great as the father. He had one excellent speech that he nailed.
  5. Patrick Schwarzenegger, the son of Arnold Schwarzenegger played the romantic lead and was also fine. The fact that his character was a swimmer made the movie 10 times more enjoyable for me, as a someone who hasn’t left the pool since she was 7 (that’s 14 years in the water). Though, I did chuckle seeing him swimming in those couple of scenes. Not only wouldn’t he get into Berkeley with that, I don’t think a Division III school would even accept him. But, I guess, that’s just a personal gripe – the same one that, for example, actual doctors have when watching the cinematic versions of medical procedures.

In short, Midnight Sun was a perfectly fine YA drama. I have been watching quite a few of those lately and this one was certainly not the worst.

Rate: 3/5

Trailer: Midnight Sun trailer

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Movie review: Love, Simon

Movie reviews

Hello!

Welcome to a review of a gay teen romance that made a straight adult believe in love again. I’m kidding. But also, not really. Anyways, this is Love, Simon!

IMDb summary: Simon Spier keeps a huge secret from his family, his friends, and all of his classmates: he’s gay. When that secret is threatened, Simon must face everyone and come to terms with his identity.

Writing

Love, Simon was written by Isaac Aptaker and Elizabeth Berger (the showrunners of This is Us), based on the book ‘Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda’ (amazing title, tbh) by Becky Albertalli. I like to think (and pretend) that with me getting older, my tastes are changing and maturing. While that is true to some extent, I’m also very prone to living in the past, so, even though I’m close to finishing university, nothing pleases me more than a trip down memory lane into my high-school years. Thus, I’ll take a high school teen movie any day of the week. From that whole nonsensical babble, you can probably guess that I loved (pun, very much, intended) Love, Simon. Also, I haven’t read the book prior to seeing the movie, so I can’t comment on any plot or character changes. I will say this: the movie definitely made me want to read the book.

So, to begin with, I loved the mix of old teen movie tropes and new contemporary ideas in the writing of the movie. I absolutely loved the message concerning identity – whether related to sexuality or not – and how the reveal of one’s identity is always a scary thing, even when it will probably be accepted. Still, I wish the movie underscored a bit more the fact that the reaction to Simon’s coming out was a borderline, best case scenario. And yet, this movie was more focused on an individual story rather than on broader social issues, so maybe it should not be penalized for not addressing the bigger problems? Maybe its goal was to just tell a love story rather than to make a political statement (let’s leave political statements for Moonlight or Call Me By Your Name?).

And that love story was great. It felt real and heartfelt, but also quite sappy. And why shouldn’t it be sappy? Why hetero-normative stories can be allowed to be so sickly sweet romantic and gay ones not? Everyone deserves a great love story and the movie not only tells that but does it too. Still, while that whole love story was all cute and escapist on screen, please be careful when meeting people online. Catfish situations are plentiful in the real world.

Anyways, going back to talking about the treatment of identity in the movie, this time in relation to the specific identity of a gay teen – I loved how the movie both played into the stereotype but also subverted it. Love, Simon was great at showcasing that one’s sexuality need not be the defining factor of one’s identity and, let alone, whole life. I highly appreciated the film’s underlying focus on the fact that nothing has to change just because somebody comes out as gay. I also really liked the fact that, while the script made the viewers relate to and understand the lead Simon, it also did not over-idealize him. Simon still had flaws and hurt other people and his actions should not be excused just because he had a secret. They should be excused because he was human, like all of us.

Lastly, while Love, Simon had some nice messages about identity and some adorable romantic moments, it also had some great instances of humor. A lot of the jokes and situation were cringe-y and awkward (and very teen appropriate). However, an equal amount of jokes were genuinely laugh-out-loud funny.

Directing

Love, Simon was directed by Greg Berlanti – the master of the DC TV’s Arrowverse as well as the writer/producer of the beloved teen shows like Dawson’s Creek and, more recently, Riverdale. I thought that he did quite a good job with his 3rd feature film that he directed (it has been 8 years since the last one). Berlanti himself is gay but I don’t want to assume that his personal experiences anyway impacted his decision to direct this film.

No matter the reasons, he did a great job. Love, Simon was a well-paced dramedy, with a good mix of lighter comedic moments and deeper emotional scenes. The cinematography and camera work were also both good – typical of a mainstream drama, though some overhead shots were pretty neat and unique. The production/set design was great too. I loved the design of Simon’s room as well as that whole dream sequence about him being gay in college. The soundtrack was lovely too. I loved the final song ‘Wild heart’ by Bleachers.

Acting

Love, Simon’s cast consisted of up-and-coming talent that you might have seen in other films/TV shows aimed at younger (and not only) audiences. The lead was played by Nick Robinson (who was absolutely amazing in this film – real and relatable) who you might remember from Jurassic World but also another YA adaptation Everything, Everything. His friend group consisted of 13 Reasons Why Katherine Langford, X-Men: Apocalypse’s Alexandra Shipp, and Jorge Lendeborg Jr. (who had a tiny role in Spider-Man: Homecoming). Keiynan Lonsdale (known by a lot of fans of Berlanti’s work as the Kid Flash on The Flash) and Miles Heizer (also of 13 Reason Why but Nerve too – another modern teen movie) also had small roles in the film.

On the adult front, Josh Duhamel (Transformers 5) and Jennifer Garner played Simon’s parents and had a couple of heartfelt and a couple of funny scenes concerning modern parenting. Tony Hale (weirdly, also from Transformers, but also Veep which I really need to watch) and Natasha Rothwell played the vice-principal and the drama teacher, respectively, and were sort of cartoonish. Their jokes went too far at times but they still somehow worked in the context of the movie.

In short, Love, Simon was a great teen dramedy that had the timeless appeal of a John Hughes’ film and the representation of the modern times!

Rate: 4.5/5

Trailer: Love, Simon trailer

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Movie review: The Lego Movie

Movie reviews

Hi!
This summer is a movie summer for me, so, without further ado, here is a review of The Lego Movie.

From the start of the movie, it had this cool dystopian vibe which we all know from series like The Hunger Games, Divergent, Delirium and which I really enjoy. The reason why this movie is so relatable and likeable is the fact that it shows us the problems that our society is dealing with – being part of grey mass, losing identity, worshiping a leader (dictator) even if he is crazy, following all the rules and listening to the instructions, not making decisions for ourselves and etc.

The motion picture has so many great, heartwarming messages for kids (adults too), but I think that nowadays not all children (or even mature grown-ups) will understand them. Let me explain why. Our society is overusing modern technologies, we are doing everything with them and, as a consequence, we lack real, face-to-face contact. This physical form of communication is crucial part in our development. Today, we are used to being alone by our laptop or phone from early childhood; we become narrow minded and closed to ourselves. When, as time goes by, we turn into vain and empty, cocky and stubborn things. Of course, I am not saying that everybody is like that, but let’s face it – all of us know at least one person with these personality traits. Also, majority of us have at least one of them inside of us but we are just too afraid and too proud of ourselves to admit our flaws.

Like I said earlier, the film had many great ideas: finding yourself and your place in the world, stressing the importance of working in a team as well as need of optimism; dealing with negativity (do not berry it deep inside, talk it out). What is more that cop character perfectly portrayed our inner fight because we all have a little bit of good cop and bad cop inside. Other problems which were dealt with included both believing in yourself and wanting to be special and remembered for your work. The animation even touched on topics like fake and real friendships and the meaning of sacrifice, the problem of jealousy.

I would also like to praise makers of the movie for their creative use of superheroes and famous people. It was a pleasant Easter egg for so many different fandoms from all the different franchises, sports, science, art and so forth.

Furthermore, the movie was really funny and witty without being vulgar. Nowadays comedies relay on dick jokes too much. In addition, the dialogue was interesting and well written.

From the production point of view – the computer-Lego graphics were awesome. This is a new and fresh idea in the animation business.

All in all, the Lego movie brought a nostalgic smile to my face, reminded me of my childhood and good old days spent playing with Lego’s, building houses and cities and all kinds of stuff. And I got to say: I want a double-deck couch!! Rate 5/5

P.S. The sequel to the movie is planned to be released in 2017.

Nails: TFIOS design

Beauty&Fashion

Hello!
The hottest thing right now in pop culture is the movie The Fault In Our Stars. As I am a huge fan of this story (John Green is a genius for writing such an exquisite book), I have decided to try my hand at nail art inspired by TFIOS..
This is a super simple, minimalistic design for those who don’t have any tools for nails and don’t want to spend a lot of time on them. Shall we begin?

First of all you will need a blue nail polish. Try to find yourself a blue color that resembles the color of TFIOS book cover. I used Maybelline New York nail polish COLORAMA in 651. Then get yourself a few toothpicks for painting. The last thing – black and white nail polish. Mine are both form a brand called Buk. I think they are only sold where I live. For finishing touches you will need a topcoat and some nail polish remover to clean around your nails if you are as messy as me.

Instructions:
1.Paint all you nails with blue color. Let them dry completely – this is important because when you try to paint something on them, you will just smudge everything into one color if their are not dry.
2. Pick a nail you will paint your cloud symbols on. I chose my left hand’s index finger.
3. Start by slowly painting the outline of the white cloud at the bottom of you nail with a toothpick. When you feel happy with the outline, color the inside of it and let it dry.
4. Get another clean toothpick a paint a black outline of the cloud at the top of your nail. Remember: the clouds have to touch (the black one is slightly covering the top of the white one).
5. Let the clouds dry completely and put on a topcoat.
6. The next thing you might do is pick another finger: I chose my right hand’s thumb. Here I painted a little question mark to resemble the Okay? question. If you want to do that, paint it by using a toothpick and a black polish. Let it dry completely and put on a topcoat.
7. This is where I stopped, because I like to have some nails that are plain, just colored with one color. But you don’t have to follow me. If you are more advanced than I am in nail art, I suggest you paint more clouds with Okay? Okay. written on them or a cigarette to recall Gus metaphor, an infinity sign, TFIOS abbreviation or something else that reminds you of the beautiful story of Hazel and Augustus. When, don’t forget to paint a layer of topcoat and by using an ear pick clean the outsides of you nail. The product is finished:)

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I hope you liked this kinda different post about nails. I hope it has been helpful. Bye:)

Movie review: The Fault In Our Stars

Movie reviews

Hello!!
This Thursday I was fortunate enough to be one of the first people in my country – Lithuania to see one of the most anticipated movies of the summer – The Fault In Our Stars. This is going to be my review.
So, I guess all of you know that TFIOS is a book written by one half of vlogbrothers – John Green. I came across his book because other youtubers (Tyler Oakley, Troye Sivan) were talking about it in their videos. Therefore, I downloaded an epub copy of it and decided to give it a try. Let me just say this: I FREAKIN’ LOVED IT. It was perfect: characters were well-developed and reliable (even though I am not sick with cancer), plot was interesting and unexpected and overall story was just spectacular. I could not wait for the movie to come to the big screen.
June 12th was pre-premiere date of TFIOS in Lithuania. I went alone without any friends because I wanted to concentrate on the movie. I also was kinda embarrassed to cry in front of them and I definitely knew that I was going to cry.
TFIOS stars Shailene Woodley as Hazel Grace and Ansel Elgort as Augustus Waters – two main characters. Although, these actors are playing brother and sister in Divergent movies, it wasn’t awkward to see them as lovers, mainly because they are such great, professional actors that portray believable characters. I don’t want to talk about story-line much because I do not want to spoil anything. Though, book readers may notice that there a couple little changes from a book to a movie: for example, before going to Amsterdam Gus does not get in a fight with his parents in the movie as he does in a book. Personally, I didn’t mind these tiny changes just because the overall story-line wasn’t affected.
The last point I would like to mention is the soundtrack of the movie. It is so good, I have already downloaded it form iTunes. However, I wish they had included Troye Sivan’s song with the same name into soundtrack. You can find it here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OqG55HdmKTE
The movie made me smile and cry at the same time. Actually, I haven’t seen that many crying girls in one place ever. The scene that brought the biggest amount of tears was the one when Hazel is giving her speach about infinities at Gus pre-funeral. That part was emotional, sad and overwhelming.
If you haven’t seen the movie, what are you waiting for? Go see it. Now! And them come back here and tell me what did you think about it. Okay? Okay. Bye

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