5 ideas about a movie: The Death of Stalin

Movie reviews

Hello!

I’m taking another break from the mainstream cinema, and reviewing a weird indie. This is The Death of Stalin.

IMDb summary: Follows the Soviet dictator’s last days and depicts the chaos of the regime after his death.

  1. Before going to see this film, I had some reservations because I knew that The Death of Stalin was a comedy and I didn’t think that anything relating to Stalin was a joking matter. That was probably because I was born and grew up in a region that directly suffered underneath his hand – Eastern Europe. He was responsible for the deaths of millions of people from that area, including a few hundred thousand people of my own nation. And while I’m not particularly patriotic and I don’t feel that loyal neither to my country nor to my nation, I do subscribe to the moral framework of the basic humanity.
  2. Nevertheless, I guess nowadays any story/event/concept is open for interpretation and reimagining. And this particular narrative has been reworked by quite a few creators. Produced for the international market, The Death of Stalin is a British made film, directed by a satirist Armando Iannucci (he created the TV show Veep), which’s script by the director himself, David Schneider, Ian Martin, and Peter Fellows, which was based on a French graphic novel by Fabien Nury and Thierry Robin, which was itself based on the historical events in the USSR. Also, not only is this film highly international, but its graphic novel roots technically make it into a comic book movie.
  3. My main worry about the film was its potential lack of ethics. I was worried that the movie would come across as making fun of the victims of the situation rather than its culprits. I’m glad to say that this was not the case. The Soviet politicians were the ones receiving all the satirized critique. They were portrayed as the walking real-life caricatures and that’s exactly who they were. The variety of accents that all of the actors employed sounded a bit strange, but I feel like they were employed deliberately, to have a stronger sense of a warped reality. One thing that annoyed me about the writing was the usage of the English swear words instead of the Russian ones. Again, this might have been a creative choice to enhance the cartoonishness of the film, but I think that the Russian swear words would have added some authenticity to the film and complimented the very accurate reproduction of the mise-en-scene (the red color palette and the tasteless pomposity).
  4. The Death of Stalin was also thematically rich and surprisingly contenporray. The film dealt with the ideas of the fake news, fabrication of truth and changing narratives – all of the things we should have left in the past but keep bringing into the future. The picture also did a good job of poking fun at the power struggle and the political plotting, showing these two developments in all their ridiculous glory. Lastly, while the movie was mostly focused on the irony/satire and the comedy of the situation, it also did not shy away from the terror/tragedy aspects of it and showed them quite explicitly.
  5. The Death of Stalin assembled a highly accomplished cast. Jeffrey Tambor (The Accountant), Steve BuscemiMichael PalinSimon Russell BealePaddy ConsidineAndrea Riseborough (Battle of the Sexes), Rupert Friend (Hitman: Agent 47), and Jason Isaacs (Star Trek: Discovery – really want to watch it), and the lone Eastern European actress in a film Olga Kurylenko (she is actually of both Russian and Ukranian ancestry but has a French citizenship).

In short, The Death of Stalin was an effective satirical reimagining that wasn’t that far from the truth.

Rate: 4.2/5

Trailer: The Death of Stalin trailer

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5 ideas about a movie: The Boss Baby

Movie reviews

Hello!

The newest DreamWorks animated picture – The Boss Baby – is currently in theaters, so, let’s talk about it!

IMDb summary: A suit-wearing briefcase-carrying baby pairs up with his seven-year-old brother to stop the dastardly plot of the CEO of Puppy Co.

  1. The Boss Baby was written by Michael McCullers, based on the picture book of the same name by Marla Frazee.  The film’s story was absolutely ridiculous but nonetheless really fun. The movie focused on the theme of family – a common and classical topic for kid’s animation. The Boss Baby also found a new inventive way to answer a question – where do babies come from? – this question seems to be popular with the animators in Hollywood, as the recent picture by Warner Animation – Storks – also tried to answer it. This picture also highlighted the sibling rivalry and the sibling relationship. Lastly, I loved how the film celebrated the children’s imagination – a crucial part of any childhood.
  2. One of the strongest parts of d The Boss Baby was the picture’s humor. The film used both more adult jokes (like business and movie references, e.g. ‘Cookies are for closers’ from the trailers) and more child-friendly gags (e.g. the insane action and the fart jokes). The picture also had some callbacks to the stereotypical horror movie scenes which felt a bit weird in a children’s movie but were appreciated by me as a grown up viewer.
  3. The Boss Baby was directed by Madagascar trilogy’s Tom McGrath.The actual 3D animation was okay – good but not groundbreaking. I think that I and a lot of movie goers just got used to usually good-looking computer animation, so it does not amaze me/us anymore. The film also had a few months of 2D animation and this one montage which felt very old school because of the accompanying music – song ‘Cheek to Cheek’ from 1935 movie musical Top Hat. The character design was also fine, although one supporting character – Stacy – reminded me a lot of Wreck-it-Ralph’s Vanellope – a beloved animated character. Lastly, the film’s visuals also were cute enough to match its narrative idea of cuteness as a threat.
  4. The titular character of the movie was voiced by Alec Baldwin. Baldwin embraced the absurdness and the hilariousness of the story and the whole movie and just nailed his performance. He has a long history of voice acting: Baldwin has narrated quite a few documentaries as well as voiced a handful of characters in animated films.
  5. Shrek’s voice actor Miles Christopher Bakshi played the child version of Tim (The Boss Baby’s brother), while Toby Maguire lent his voice to the adult Tim. Other well-known actors/TV personalities like Steve Buscemi, Jimmy Kimmel, and Lisa Kudrow also had roles of varying sizes.

In short, The Boss Baby is a perfectly passable animated picture. It doesn’t have the most original story or fresh visuals, but it definitely provides a fine time at the cinema for both kids and adults who can’t grow up (me!).

Rate: 3.3/5

Trailer: The Boss Baby trailer