Day Trip to Loch Ness

Sightseeing

Hello!

Welcome to another short post of the sightseeing variety. On Saturday, I went to probably the most famous tourist attraction in Scotland – the Loch Ness lake. I didn’t find the Loch Ness Monster (also affectionately known as Nessie) but I did manage to have a great time on this one day trip.

I, and the group of students from my university’s International Society, set off from Aberdeen at around 8am in the morning. On our way to Loch Ness, we stopped at Inverness for food and other supplies. Before noon, we reached the lake itself and paused to take pictures of its northern side, where River Ness flows into Loch Ness.

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The first proper attraction on our list was Urquhart Castle or the ruins of it. Situated on the shores of the lake, this castle was a perfect stronghold for various Scottish lords and clans, until it was destroyed at the end of 17th century. Nowadays, the ruins are an excellent place for historical sightseeing – they are massive and it takes at least and hour to walk around the remains of the castle and check out all nooks and corners of it. There is also a cafe, a gift shop, and a film theater, which screens a short movie on the history of the castle, nearby.

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Next stop of the trip was the tiny village/settlement of Fort Augustus, located at the southernmost point of the Loch Ness lake. Not only does this tiny town is super cute to walk around and has an amazing view of the lake, it also the place of the Caledonian Canal – a massive structure of locks, bridges, and aqueducts used to regulate the water levels in the surrounding lochs. Speaking abut the stunning views – during our visit to the town, it started to rain a bit and the sun was also shining quite brightly (it was starting to set), so, we managed to catch a glimpse of a full rainbow above the Loch Ness lake. I don’t remember the last time I’ve seen a full rainbow, especially in such an open and unobstructed place. The sight was magical and I couldn’t stop taking photos. Fort Augustus also had a gift shop, in which I treated myself and my family to some souvenirs.

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The following photos are of the postcards and other gifts that I purchased. I got a variety of cards to add to my collection as well as few to send to my aunt and a friend. Also, I got a fridge magnet for my parents and a plushie of Nessie, because it is the stupidest and the cutest thing ever and I couldn’t just not buy it.

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I highly recommend you visit this superb place if you get a chance. The more of Scotland I see, the more I fall in love with its nature. Last spring, I went to the Isle of Skye and Glencoe Valley and blogged about it, if that interests you.

Have a great week!

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Sightseeing: The Old Town of Warsaw

Sightseeing

Hello!

A few weeks ago, I told you about my experience attending ANTI World Tour in Warsaw. While going to Rihanna’s concert was my main reason for traveling to the capital of Poland, it was not the only thing I did there. After partying with Riri on Friday and wasting the night watching the opening ceremony of the Rio Olympics, I spent the whole of Saturday walking around Warsaw’s Old Town.

With the help of Google Maps, I strolled by the Presidental Palace, the Royal Castle, the Old Market Place, the St. John’s Archcathedral, the barbican of Warsaw, the St. Anne’s Church, the Grand National Opera Theatre, the Palace of Culture and Science, the University of Warsaw, the Nicolaus Copernicus Monument, the Fryderyk Chopin Museum, the Carmelite Church, the Mermaid of Warsaw next to the Świętokrzyski Bridge and many other sights and buildings that I can’t name.

I also really wanted to visit the Copernicus Science Center, however, the queue was huge, I would have probably waited at least 3 or more hours just to get inside. Moreover, due to the overflow of people inside the building, they had temporarily suspended the sale of tickets, so I might have spent the whole day just waiting. Well, at least now I have a reason to come back to Warsaw.

For lunch, I went to this nice restaurant where instead of chairs they had swings next to the tables. To remember Warsaw, I bought 3 postcards to add to my collection and a few fridge magnets. One of the magnets has a picture of the stadium where the Rihanna’s concert took place.

The weather for my walk wasn’t the greatest – it rained occasionally, however, at least it wasn’t unbearably hot. I will take rain and fog instead of boiling hot sun any day.

Warsaw has almost 2 million inhabitants and it is also the capital of Poland. I could definitely tell that the city was alive and buzzing even on Saturday – while the streets were mainly filled with tourists in the early morning, after midday, the actual citizens of Warsaw started taking  to the streets. I saw some kind of protest as well as preparations for either a running or cycling marathon being carried out.

Bellow, I’ve included a few galleries with the photos from my walk. I love old European cities and I felt extremely lucky to have gotten a chance to see another one. The features of Warsaw that I especially liked were all the buildings with patterns and a few modern construction dispersed in between the old structures.

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Sightseeing: Treetop Walking Path, Anyksciai, Lithuania

Sightseeing

Hello!

Moving to a different country (Scotland) really made me appreciate my home country (Lithuania) more. So, this summer, I tried my best to see more of it – especially its nature.

Hence, on Saturday, I took some time to visit the newly established Treetop Walking Path near the town of Anyksciai. It is basically a path through the forest that is raised around 20 meters in the air. The whole path is 300 meters long. At the end of it, there is an approximately 34 meters high watchtower that slightly shakes and moves when the wind is strong. Other than that, the path is completely safe to walk and enjoyable even for those who have a fear of heights.

The scenery looked gorgeous: it was lovely to see all the greenery and the river from above. I imagine that the view should also be awesome during the autumn, when the leaves turn brown and orange, or during the winter, when everything is covered by snow.

Another object that people tend to visit when they come to Anyksciai is the boulder of Puntukas. It is the second largest rock in Lithuania and is located near the beginning of the Treetop Path. Both of these attractions are surrounded by forests which are worth a visit too.

I suggest that you definitely visit the Anyksciai Treetop Walking Path if you ever get a chance. It would probably be a good idea to go there on a weekday since it was packed on the weekend. There was a 2km traffic jam/parking line just to get there. Needless to say, I did not expect there to be so much interest in the place. 

Bellow, you will find some photos from the location. Enjoy!

Sightseeing: Kaunas Reservoir Regional Park 

Sightseeing

Hi!

Welcome to another sightseeing post. This time, I will show you a few photos of my native country of Lithuania, especially the snaps that I took while visiting Kaunas Reservoirs/Regional Park.

Since I no longer live in Lithuania during the majority of the year, I cherish each and every moment that I spend exploring my motherland. In addition, my relocation to UK/move abroad allowed me to better see how beautiful and unique Lithuania’s nature actually is.

On Sunday, I and my family visited a few locations around the Kaunas Reservoir a.k.a. the artificial lake. This are is also known as the Kaunas Reservoir Regional Park. We walked around the Juniper Valey (in Lithuania language, Kadagiu slenis) and then followed the Geological Trail of Ziegzdriai (in Lithuania language, Ziegzdriu Geologinis Takas). All the photos bellow are from these 2 places.

Both the valley path and the trail are comfortable and convenient. The valley path has a wooden surface, while the trail is a simple forest path. The car parks near the beginning of the valley path and the trail are small but sufficient.

The scenery is amazing and an exceptional example of Northern/Eastern European nature – lakes and spruce/fir trees. There are quite a few informational and interactional displays. The signs that ask the visitors not to litter are also fun – one of them say that Chuck Norris will be angry with you if you throw rubbish around and the other one repeats this message in a few languages. There is also a sign that says: ‘There is no wi-fi, please, connect with nature’.

I had a great time walking around, breathing fresh air, and just taking in all the beautiful sights. I highly suggest you visit this place, no matter if you are a Lithuania or a foreigner. I suggest you use GPS, though, as this place is not that easy to find, although it is close to a major city of Kaunas

I’ve already done one sightseeing post about Kaunas Reservoir/Lagoon. You can find it here. Have a great week!

Sightseeing: a museum day in Vilnius

Sightseeing

Hello!

I haven’t done a sightseeing post in a very long time but today is the day that I bring it back. Hope you’ll enjoy it!

Some of you may know that my favorite city in Lithuania (my native country) and one of my favorite cities in the world is Vilnius – the capital of Lithuania. I have already done a post about places I enjoy visiting while in Vilnius (find it here). Luckily, today, I had another chance to visit 3 of the capital’s biggest museums, which I can’t wait to tell you all about.

To begin with, me and my aunt visited a fashion exhibition at the Lithuanian Museum of Applied Art (museums site here). Here we saw an exhibition called “Three Centuries of Fashion“. All of the clothes and the accessories, dating back to 18th, 19th and 20th century, were from the collection of Alexandre Vassiliev. He is an internationally acclaimed French (though born in Russia) costume and set designer as well as a fashion historian. His collection truly conveys and reflects the words of the King of France Louis XIV that fashion is a “mirror of history”. 







My favorite pieces were the flapper/swing dresses from the 1920s (a la The Great Gatsby): 

Also, I really loved the puffy dresses and accessories from the 1960s (a la Hairspray):

There was also another exhibition consisting of pieces from slightly newer Vassiliev’s collection. This one was called a ‘Rebellion in a Boudoir‘. Clothes, which were presented, were from the era of the hippies – 1970s. Colorful dresses, crazy prints, punk jackets and grunge vests as well as sequined jumpsuits were all included. ABBA’s music was playing in the background. It felt like falling through a wormhole into my grandpa’s young adult days.







Next, we went to the Lithuanian National Museum (visit its site here) which houses a wide variety of exhibits. You can find a plethora of paintings, old books and statues, ethnographic clothes, swords and spears and many more things, which have one thing in common – they represent the history of Lithuania and its surrounding countries. Surprisingly, you can even find paintings from Japan, which were gifted to counts and dukes of Lithuania and ended up in a museum a few centuries later. There is also a massive reproduction of one of the biggest battles of the medieval Europe – the battle of Grunwald (wiki).

Lastly, we visited the The Museum of Money (link here), which, to my mind, is one of the best if not the best museum in Lithuania for the way it uses modern technologies. The admission to the museum is free but you can do so many things here and not just stare at blank walls. The museum presents the history of the Lithuania’s currencies as well as provides visitors with the information about the world currencies via interactive computer with 9 screens. You can also see a wide variety of international money in person. Plus, a bunch of computers invite you to test your knowledge of money and finance or challenge you to try to guess which country in Europe a certain euro coin belongs to. You can even get a few free souvenirs – one of them is a book mark, which you make by pressing a seal of a coin on a piece of metal in a special machine. Another attraction is a special weighting scale where you can get an official document, which pronounces your worth: you weight yourself and find out how much would you cost in dollars and euros if you were made from gold, silver or platinum.

 Amber as the first currency in trading.

 World currencies – this one is from Hong Kong.

The pyramid made from the smallest currency of Lithuania – a million of cents (pennies). True, these are the pennies of litas (a penny is a one hundredth of a litas) and my country has joined the Euro zone in January of 2015, so these coins have no worth anymore.

The receipt of my own personal worth and a handmade bookmark.

To sum up, I really liked spending a day in Vilnius once again. I love fashion, so, I highly enjoyed seeing the clothes from all the different eras. Moreover, I am a huge history buff, so visiting a national museum was a dream come true. Lastly, who doesn’t like money and doesn’t want to know more about it?

If you ever get a chance to visit the capital of my country, I suggest you check these places out. Sadly, both fashion exhibitions will only be open till the end of October, so don’t miss out. Have a great day! Bye!

Movie review: Unbroken

Movie reviews

Hi!
On Monday, I went to the cinema to watch Angelina Jolie’s Unbroken. I have seen several films depicting World War II events from different angles (Schindler’s list, Fury, Inglorious Basterds, Pearl Harbor, Forest of Gods and The Imitation Game) and now Unbroken joins this list.

In short I would describe the film as a mixture of Life of Pi and Fury with a pinch of Forest of Gods and topped of with Edge of Tomorrow.

Unbroken isn’t Angelina’s directorial debut – it’s her 2nd time being behind the camera. The film tells a story of Louis Zamperini – an Olympic athlete who spent the 2nd World War in a prisoner of war camp in Japan after surviving 47 days of a raft in the middle of the ocean. It’s based on a book by Laura Hillenbrand as well as real life events. Sadly, the real Louis Zamperini died in spring of 2014 and didn’t get to see his life on the big screen.

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Acting

Louis Zamperini is portrayed by Jack O’Connell – a British actor who is best known for his work on the TV show Skins. I liked his performance, it was so-so at the beginning of the movie but in the end, when Jack really got into the character, it was just amazing. The emotional dual between him and the Bird truly showed his talent and made me enjoy the scene which was actually horrible and heartbreaking but inspiring at the same time. I would love to see more of his work.

Speaking about the Bird – a Japanese general who tortured Louis both mentally and physically – he was played by a Japanese singer Miyavi. The character seemed a bit cartoon-y to me – almost like a stupid school bully. Nonetheless, I hated the character almost as much as Christoph Waltz’s Hans Landa in the Inglorious Basterds, so Miyavi did a great job as a villain.

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Other cast members included : Domhnall Gleeson, Garrett Hedlund, Finn Wittrock, Jai Courtney, Luke Treadaway, Jordan Patrick Smith and many others. As you can already tell, this is an all male cast type of movie. I don’t have any problems with that because there were no women at war. However, I do have a problem with the fact that I can’t remember anything about the characters that these actors played with the exceptions of Jack O’Connel and Miyavi. They didn’t develop them well enough and didn’t make me care about them or even remember them at all.

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Visuals and Directing

The movie is beautifully shot and I really liked Angelina’s work as a director. The scenes in the water were cool but sometimes cheesy while prisoner of war camp was portrayed realistically.

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Sport

Louis Zamperini was an Olympic runner and for me as an athlete, the part which told us about his athletic career was the most interesting. I also loved the fact that they didn’t diminish the importance of sport in Louis Zamperini’s life. If he hadn’t been an athlete and hadn’t trained as hard as he did, he probably wouldn’t have survived the war. I loved the clip of the real Louis running with the Olympic torch in 1998 Winter Olympics in Japan.

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Religion

Louis Zamperini also was a religious person, who found God when he needed him the most. Religion’s theme was mentioned in the film but didn’t explored deeply enough. The end of the film was really touching and made me tear up. It showed the importance of forgiveness – sometimes it’s better to turn the other cheek than to raise a fist.

Criticisms

Unbroken received mixed reviews from the critics and was shut down from the award’s season. Overall, I liked the film, though, a few scenes were really unbelievable and took me out of the movie. For example, their fight with a shark – you can’t catch a shark with your bare hands. The pacing had a few problems, but I would still recommend to watch this movie if you are a sport’s fan and interested in history.

Rate 4/5

Trailer: Unbroken trailer

Photos: Screenshots form the trailer.

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Sightseeing: A day in Vilnius

Sightseeing

Hello my dear readers!

I haven’t posted in a few days and I thought that I will tell you about my day in a few sentences. Today, a bunch of seniors from my school went on an educational trip to Vilnius, the capital of Lithuania. We attended a lecture about study possibilities at Vilnius university – the best higher education school in my country. We also walked aroud university’s library and a few study halls. This university was established in 1579 and most of the building stated the same from the 16th century. There is also a lot of paintings and sculptures from 18th and 19th centuries. After visiting university, we had a few hours of free time at the city centre, so I and my classmate strolled up and down Gediminas street, looked for clothes and H&M and had lunch at a small and cosy cafe. We also saw a building were parlament of Lithuania meets and make decisions about our country’s future.

I had a great day because I learned something new about possible opportunities for me after graduating from high school. Moreover, I love the architecture of Vilnius old town and city centre. It combines modern building with historical sights. In addition, some buildings have already been decorated for Christmas and I love to walk under fairy lights and other decorations. Bellow you will find a few photos from the university and Vilnius’s old town. Bye!

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Sightseeing: Turkey

Sightseeing

Hello!

I hope that you are having a great Monday wherever you live. Currently, it is Monday evening in Lithuania and I am relaxing after a long hard day at school. The school stuff wasn’t really that hard but I am also sick, I have a cold and terrible headache so that certainly didn’t add anything nice to my day.

But enough of my ranting, let’s get on with a blog post. Today, I am going to tell you about my holidays in Turkey from October 2013.Since it was almost a year ago, I am sorry if I don’t remember all the details.

We started our journey in Vilnius airport. There, on a cold Monday morning we boarded a Small planet travel agency plane which took us to Antalya – one of the biggest resort cities in Turkey. Turkey’s culture is so different than Lithuania’s: there are people everywhere, they are selling stuff just on the street and they are shouting really loudly. Everything is colorful and the smells of fresh fruits are mixing with traffic fumes. It was a lot to take in at first. I wasn’t staying in Antalya. My hotel – La Mer Art – was in Goynuk – a small village near Kemer. A short bus trip took me and my parents there and when we finally got checked into a hotel it was already dinner time.

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The food was amazing. You could choose form several different cuisines, diet or vegetarian tables. And the sweets! They are so sweet, even too sweet for my taste. The same evening we wondered around for a bit and went to the beach to see how the moon was hovering above the Mediterranean Sea.

The next morning, after a very late and filling breakfast we went to the beach, sunbathed, swam and went diving until lunch. After lunch we were laying by the pool and just relaxing after yesterday’s flight. Around 4-5 o’clock when it have already gotten pretty cold (The sun would go over the mountains and the temperature would fall down about 10 degrees Celsius) me and my dad would go to the gym and exercise for a few hours (Work out until all the calories of those sweets are burned) and then go to the tennis court for a quick match. My mom would go enjoy the hotel’s spa or read a book by the pool.

After dinner, my family and another family of our friends which we were travelling with would sit in a bar or in lounge area which was filled with Russian tourists mostly. The animation team of the hotel was amazing; there were always something to do or an interesting performance to watch in the evening.

I pretty much spent all my week the same way I spent my first day. But we also visited nearby Kemer city and walked around for a bit, bought some national Turkey sweets – Turkish delight (lokum) to bring home and I also bought some commemorative postcards (photo below). (Be careful while shopping in Turkey – they like to sell a lot of fake designers’ stuff!) Plus, we also visited the Goynuk village where our hotel was situated, tasted some traditional Turkish kebab. One morning we woke up really early and went to see how the sun was rising from the sea. We also went on a water motorbike ride which was super fun and exciting.

The surrounding nature and view was astonishing. We stayed near Taurus Mountains, so you would walk out into hotel’s garden and see the sea on one side and mountains on the other side. There were also a lot of palm trees and colorful flowers as well.

I was really sad to leave Turkey. It was the best holiday’s I ever had and I definitely want to come back there again.

My summer holidays in Lithuania 2014

Sightseeing

Hello!

How are you feeling today? Since it is the last day of summer, I decided to tell you all about my summer holidays and what I have been up to.

You have already read about swimming and running marathons that I have participated in this summer as well as my trip to Berlin. You can check those posts again here: Multi-sports, Festival, Swimming 1, Swimming 2, Swimming 3, Swimming 4.

But that is not all what I did this summer:

In the middle of July, me and a bunch of my friends went camping for a couple of days. We rented kayaks and rowed 20 km down the river Dubysa (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dubysa). In the evening we went swimming and relaxed in a sauna, then spent all night talking by the fire and went to sleep to our tents in the early morning. The next day, after late breakfast, we played football and volleyball and then went home. It was a nice little trip that helped us bond even more.

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At the end of July, me and my dad went to Klaipėda (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Klaip%C4%97da) and spent a couple of days by the Baltic Sea. On Monday, we went to resort town Smiltynė (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smiltyn%C4%97) by ferry, walked in a pine forest for a bit and spent the rest of the day by the sea, sunbathing and swimming. On Tuesday, we rented bikes and took another ferry to Nida (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nida,_Lithuania) (we went by Curonian lagoon http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Curonian_Lagoon) and then cycled back to Klaipeda. We cycled 50 km in 5 hours. The same day we walked around the harbor, saw a sculpture for people who died at sea. On Wednesday,  we went back to Smiltynė and relaxed for a bit before going back to the city.

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In the middle of August, we did another cycling trip from Kaunas to Kačergine. We cycled about 30 km there and back. Kacergines forest (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ka%C4%8Dergin%C4%97) was amazing and perfect place for calm recreation.

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And just today me and my family went to the park by Kaunas lagoon (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kaunas_Reservoir_Regional_Park )  and walked around, visited Pažaislis monastery (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pa%C5%BEaislis_Monastery).

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I hope that you had an amazing summer and that you have enough energy to get back to school,work or whatever you are doing.Bye!

Sightseeing: Berlin, Germany

Sightseeing

Hi!

Last month I visited Berlin for a 6th or 7th time. For my blog readers this means only one thing – another sightseeing blog post.So let’s begin, shall we?

Firstly we visited Berlin city center and walked around for a bit. Then we went to one of the most famous buildings in Berlin – Reich-stag building. It is a government building that has been rebuilt a couple of times. The view from the top of it is breathtaking.

After spending time in the city center we took a metro to the Berlin zoo. It is also located in the city center and it is quite weird to walk around animals and at the same time see skyscrapers hovering above you.

As a brochure of the zoo says it has the biggest diversity of animals in Europe. It was opened in 1844 and now it is the oldest zoological garden in Germany.  The zoo also has an aquarium complex joined with it. In addition, it is Europe’s largest landscape zoo. It took like 4 hours to walk through it.

The tickets’ prices are not too bad in my opinion. Adult tickets with the permission to enter the aquarium cost 20 Euros, without aqua – 13 Euros. It’s 15 and 10 Euros for students respectively. You can find all the prices here: http://www.zoo-berlin.de/

I really enjoyed walking around this garden; I loved seeing all the animals, especially the elephants. They were drinking water with their trunks and looked just too cute doing it. Bellow you will find as much photos as I could fit into one blog post. Bye!

P.S. A note on the metro system of Berlin. I was pleasantly surprised how clear everything is. I have been on metros in France and in other cities of Germany and there I was always half-lost. But in everything Berlin is clear, there are so many sings to guide you and people are also really helpful. The metro stations are also super clean as you would expect from Germans.