Movie review: The Killing of a Sacred Deer

Movie reviews

Hello!

The reviews of the awards’ hopefuls continue. Today, we are discussing The Killing of a Sacred Deer.

IMDb summary: Steven, a charismatic surgeon, is forced to make an unthinkable sacrifice after his life starts to fall apart when the behavior of a teenage boy he has taken under his wing turns sinister.

The Killing of a Sacred Deer is director’s Yorgos Lanthimos’s and writer’s Efthymis Filippou’s follow-up movie to The Lobstera smart, sophisticated, and artistic dystopia, which I really enjoyed. Thus, I was looking forward to this film.

Writing

The Killing of a Sacred Deer’s writing was extraordinary. At the basest level, the film told a revenge story, inspired by the ancient Greek literature, especially the tragedies. However, so many unique details and topics were used to embellish this revenge story. A lot of them left me flabbergasted and puzzled, but in a good way.

The characters in the film were so peculiar. Their ‘prim and proper’ facade was very obviously just a facade. In truth, they were all deeply disturbed individuals, some more than others. They all had a weird aura of emotionlessness and eagerness about them. They blurted out sentences that ‘normal’ people don’t say. This all added up to a warped reality feeling of the film’s world.

The lead character, from the very beginning, was an unsettling one to watch. His relationship with the teenage boy also seemed inappropriate from the start, even if for different potential reasons that it ultimately turned out to be. Additionally, it was interesting to see how the movie explored the immense responsibility and the burden of doctors, even if taken to the farthest extreme.

Sticking with the theme of medicine, The Killing also commented on human psychology and introduced me to an idea of psychosomatic disorders, which I had never heard of before. Having said that, I wish that the movie had a more explicit explanation for the illnesses of the children – was it certainly related to psychology? Or was there a supernatural element? A symbolic explanation? Who knows. Maybe that’s also sorta the point, not to know completely.

The film also investigated the concept of family and family relationships. This was no positive representation of a family, but the example of parental favoritism and sacrifice (not like self-sacrifice, though, not even close). The questions of morality also sprung up from the family concept.

While I thought that the narrative, on the whole, was really strong, I also got a feeling that the writers weren’t sure how to end it. The 3rd act seemed to be winding down rather than building up to something and I’m not entirely sure that the conclusion we got was fully satisfying. Then again, when the entire movie was unsettling, why should it have a satisfying ending? Isn’t it more appropriate to carry the signature feeling till the very last frame?

Directing

I’ve seen this picture being describe as a modern take on Hitchcock and I do see some similarities to the thrillers of the beloved filmmaker.  What stood out to me the most, was how the director Lanthimos was able to take an already disturbing textual story and make it feel 10 times more creepy in a film form. The Killing of a Sacred Deer had a few very graphic and shocking images, like its opening frame, which popped out of the darkness and completely startled me. The sacral music that accompanied the image only strengthened the effect. That score, full of high pitched string orchestra sounds, deep drum noises, and a sacral/choral elements, was, in general, employed very effectively throughout the film. The long tracking shots, the zoom ins/outs, and the steady frame also contributed to that feeling that something was off or not what it seemed.

Acting

The whole cast delivered great performances, that combined the aforementioned qualities of eagerness and emotionless. Colin Farrell (Fantastic Beasts) was reunited with Lanthimos whom he worked with on The Lobster, and was just amazing to watch. Nicole Kidman (Lion, Genius), who was recently in The Beguiled with Farrell, was equally brilliant. Barry Keoghan (Dunkirk) was deeply disturbing, troubling, and just perfect for the role. Raffey Cassidy and Sunny Suljic starred as the children of Farrell’s and Kidman’s characters and were also really good. Lastly, Alicia Silverstone had a minor role and I did not even recognize her on screen. To me, she will always be stuck in a Clueless era.

 

 

In short, if mother! was the queen of creepiness than The Killing of a Sacred Deer is the king of unsettledness.

 

Rate: 4/5

Trailer: The Killing of a Sacred Deer trailer

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Movie review: Tomorrowland

Movie reviews

Hello!

A few days ago, I went to see the newest Disney movie – Tomorrowland and this is going to be my review! I am a huge fan of futuristic films, so I was excited to see this one.

First of all, I would like to praise Disney for making an original movie in this sequel, prequel, remake world. However, let’s don’t forget that this film was inspired by a ride in Disney world and that could go either way.

In addition, this movie is a CGI fest. It’s really interesting to compare it to the last movie I’ve seen before watching this one – Mad Max (review). While Mad Max relies almost entirely on practical effects, Tomorrowland is a complete opposite.

IMDB summary: Bound by a shared destiny, a teen bursting with scientific curiosity and a former boy-genius inventor embark on a mission to unearth the secrets of a place somewhere in time and space that exists in their collective memory.

If you have seen the trailer for this film, you know that it doesn’t give you any clues about what the actual story of the film is, so I went into to this film knowing absolutely nothing about it, except the vague premise of it.

Story & Pacing

This film had an interesting plot at first, however, the ending was really cliche. Moreover, I thought that the first two acts of the film were too slow, while the last one was rushed too much. Essentially, the whole film to me felt like an advert for Disney land attraction, though, the finale scenes turned it into a promotional video for the Green Peace.

Furthermore, despite the fact that this film has a rating of PG-13 (in my country), I believe it should be rated just PG (like in the US) because it’s quite childish story wise and it focuses a lot on child actors.

Acting

George Clooney was the start power of this film and it looked like he really cared about the project. For me, personally, he felt out of place.

Britt Robertson played the main character of the film and she was really good. She was actually the thing that brought me into this movie because I’ve seen her in The Longest Ride and I’ve watched the TV show she was in – The Secret Circle.

Raffey Cassidy, being only 12 or 13 years old, was the scene stealer of the film. Look out, because she is a start of the future.

The reveal concerning Hugh Laurie’s character wasn’t significant or surprising.  However, it was nice to see him getting gigs because I haven’t seen him in any big films after the House ended.

Themes

The themes of this film were both pessimistic and optimistic at the same time. While environmental messages were powerful, I don’t believe that they impacted the audience’s thoughts and feelings. The romantic aspect of the film was also handed improperly and even creepily.

The only thing I really enjoyed was the back story, how the Tomorrowland was created – I really love when films include real-ish historical facts.

Directing

The film is directed by Brad Bird, who previously made The Incredibles and Mission Impossible-Ghost Protocol. I have enjoyed both of these films and really liked Tomorrowland from the visual perspective. The CGI could have been finished up more finely in some places, but it was really great overall.The actions scenes were also shot interestingly.

To sum up, while the film was pleasing for the eyes, it didn’t please my mind or heart. Sorry, if this review was quote short, but I didn’t  want to talk badly about the movie and I’m sad that I didn’t like it, because I really wanted to.

Rate 2.5/5

Trailer: Tomorrowland trailer 

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