Movie review: The Lego Ninjango Movie

Movie reviews

Hello!

Welcome to a review of the 3rd Lego movie and the 2nd one this year. This is The Lego Ninjago Movie!

IMDb summary: Shunned by everyone for being the son of an evil warlord, a teenager seeks to defeat him with the help of his fellow ninjas.

To begin with, I really loved the 2014’s original The Lego Movie and adored the 2017’s The Lego Batman Movie as both a continuation of the Lego franchise and as a parody of the comic book movie/the superhero genre. The Lego Ninjago Movie seemed like a cool expansion of the Lego cinematic series though I didn’t know anything about the Lego ninja sub-brand. Also, I had no idea why they chose to release it this year, so close to The Lego Batman.

Writing

The Lego Ninjago Movie was written by a bunch of screenwriters, way more than it should have had. The two directors Bob Logan and Paul Fisher, and the writers William Wheeler, Tom Wheeler, Jared Stern, and John Whittington. Additionally, the story credits went to Hilary Winston, Dan Hageman, and Kevin Hageman. This just seems excessive: why would not that original children’s movie need 10 writers????

Speaking about that lack of originality: The Lego Ninjago Movie was super similar to The Lego Movie. And while we applauded its originality in 2014, 3 years later and a second-time around, the same ideas just don’t seem that fresh. This film had the same type of a framing device – real-world/live-action set-up which enveloped the lego story. The message – one about encouraging the imagination, play, and the storytelling during childhood – also stayed the same but I can’t really fault it because of how positive even if repetitive it is.

Speaking about the Lego part of the narrative: it was fine but nothing new. The plot focused on the child of a villain (Disney’s Descendants?) and dealt with his experiences as a high schooler (any teen movie ever?) who has a secret superhero life (Big Hero 6?). The ninja characters, in general, seemed to have been inspired by Transformers, Power Rangers, Pacific Rim, and Ironman. I’m guessing that a lot of Japanese/samurai movies were also consulted (and their clips included in the actual film). The elemental powers were cute but old. Lastly, the whole father-son thing was very Star Wars.

The humor of the film wasn’t bad but, at times, it did feel like the movie was trying too hard to be hip and cool (and the kids are cynical these days). That ultimate weapon reveal was super dumb but still hilarious, though.

Directing

The Lego Ninjago Movie had three directors: Charlie Bean, Paul Fisher, and Bob Logan – all long time animators but new to directing.  Speaking about that part of the film which they were best at – the animation was spectacular. This animation style still amazes me and I applaud all the animators for achieving the visuals that I haven’t thought possible just a few years back. The pacing was good too, stuff was always happening for the most part and the movie’s runtime wasn’t stretched out for no reason. Also, this quick pace kinda gave a movie a video game-esque feeling, which was good. There were a lot of dances and songs included too, similarly to the other two Lego films. However, The Lego Ninjago Movie differed from its predecessors in one aspect: it actually did feel like a commercial for the Lego toys way much more than the others did. I know that both The Lego Movie and The Lego Batman Movie were ads for Lego too but at least they were not as obvious about it and had something extra (like the originality or the references) to embellish the ad. The Lego Ninjago Movie lacked that extra.

Voice work

The Lego Ninjago Movie assembled quite a stellar voice cast. Of course, one cannot make a ninja movie without Jackie Chan, so he both voiced a character and appeared on screen (I kinda think that he is still appealing to kids, while the adults don’t care much for him anymore). Dave Franco (Nerve, Now You See Me) and Justin Theroux (The Girl on The Train) voiced the son and the father and were fun to listen to. Silicon Valley’s Kumail Nanjiani (The Big Sick) and Zach Woods played the child-friendly version of their characters from the HBO show. Michael Peña (Ant-Man, The Martian, Collateral Beauty), Abbi JacobsonFred Armisen, and Olivia Munn (X-Men) rounded out the cast and delivered good aural performances too.

In short, The Lego Ninjago Movie was an okay addition to the Lego movie franchise. It mostly just rehashed the same stuff and didn’t add anything new but was still entertaining and enjoyable.

Rate: 3.2/5

Trailer: The Lego Ninjago Movie trailer

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2016 Summer Movies RANKED

Movie reviews

Hello!

The summer movie season has come to a close, so, it’s time to rank the films that Hollywood offered us this year. The 2015’s summer movie list is here if you want to check it out.

Now, summer movie season doesn’t technically start until April or even May, but, since this is my blog, I will be including some pictures that came out in March because they were big summer-type blockbusters. Also, I will be diving the features into categories – these categories will mostly focus on the genre. While I haven’t seen all the movies that have been released, I’ve definitely watched and reviewed the majority of them so my list(s) will be quite extensive. Lastly, the previous rates that I’ve given these films don’t really count – I will take them into consideration and will also try to be as objective as possible, but my subjective feelings and likes/dislikes will also play a role. Either way, I hope you will enjoy this list and check out the reviews that you might have missed or that just simply interest you!

Comic-Book Movies:

  1. Captain America: Civil War
  2. Suicide Squad
  3. Batman: The Killing Joke
  4. X-Men: Apocalypse
  5. Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice (theatrical cut)

Live-Action Fairytales:

  1. The Legend of Tarzan
  2. The Jungle Book
  3. The Huntsman: Winter’s War
  4. Pete’s Dragon
  5. Alice Through The Looking Glass
  6. The BFG

Sci-Fi/Action Movies:

  1. Star Trek Beyond
  2. Warcraft
  3. Ben-Hur
  4. Jason Bourne
  5. TMNT: Out of Shadows
  6. Now You See Me 2
  7. Independence Day: Resurgence

Thrillers:

  1. Nerve
  2. Eye in the Sky
  3. The Shallows
  4. Money Monster
  5. Bastille Day
  6. The Neon Demon

Dramas:

  1. Me Before You
  2. Florence Foster Jenkins
  3. Café Society
  4. Genius
  5. A Hologram for The King

Comedies:

  1. The Nice Guys
  2. Eddie The Eagle
  3. Sausage Party
  4. Central Intelligence
  5. Everybody Wants Some!!
  6. Ghostbusters
  7. Bad Moms
  8. War Dogs
  9. Mike and Dave Need Wedding Dates

Animation:

  1. Finding Dory
  2. The Secret Life of Pets

Upcoming films

Autumn is usually a slow time for movies before the awards season really kicks in. However, I’m looking forward to a few cinematic adaptations of bestsellers, coming out this fall, including Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children, Girl on a Train and Inferno. In addition, Marvel’s Magic Movie – Doctor Strange and Disney’s Moana will also reach theaters, while possible mainstream awards’ contenders like The Magnificient Seven, Sully, Snowden, and Arrival will also premiere. The Harry Potter world will be expanded with Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them, while Tom Cruise will give as another solid action film – Jack Reacher: Never Go Back. I’m quite excited for all these pictures and you can definitely look forward to their reviews in the near future.

Also, I would like to thank all my followers for taking the time to click the ‘Follow’ button, for reading, liking and commenting on my posts. It means a lot to me and I can’t wait to continue writing and discussing movies with you! I also appreciate the fact that you do tolerate my other post – mainly sport and sightseeing ones! Thank You again!

Movie review: Nerve

Movie reviews

Hello!

Nerve – an original thriller in a sea of reboots, remakes and sequels – has finally hit theaters, so let’s talk about it!

IMDb summary: A high school senior finds herself immersed in an online game of truth or dare, where her every move starts to become manipulated by an anonymous community of “watchers.”

Writing

Nerve’s screenplay was written by Jessica Sharzer, who has mostly worked on TV until now. The script was based on Jeanne Ryan’s book with the same name, so it is not a totally original story, but at least it hasn’t been done on the big screen before. I absolutely loved the narrative of Nerve. I thought that it was probably the most contemporary thriller I’ve ever seen. Its topics were extremely relatable to all teenagers and young adults out there.

The cool update on the Truth or Dare game reminded me of YouTube Challenge videos and I think that the majority of the audiences of this film do watch YouTube and will understand where I’m coming from. On top of being extremely entertaining, the film also had some nice messages and things to say. It explored a modern friendship, full of jealousy and social stigmas. It showed the scary side of the Internet – the total loss of privacy – and cautioned its viewers to be careful. It also showed that computer skills and even hacking are useful traits to know in the modern world. Finally, the most important idea that Nerve spread was that one can be brave in the crowd or when he/she is protected by their username, however, the anonymous actions online have dire consequences in the real world to actual people and even oneself. This message should hang above everyone’s computer.

On a personal note, I loved the film Nerve because I could relate to it. I’m a kind of person who rarely takes risks or leaves her comfort zone, so I understood the character of Vee. In addition, being somebody who is usually in the shadow of her friends, I understood how the feeling of validation or acceptance can be intoxicating and addicting.

Directing

Nerve was directed  by Henry Joost and Ariel Schulman, who did the documentary Catfish and 3rd and 4th of the Paranormal Activity films. I really enjoyed the things they did with the project. The pace was always fast, so the story was unfolding non-stop. A small pause was taken before the big finale, but it didn’t seem like the movie slowed down – that break really built tension. When the actual finale of the film was happening, it did seem a bit over-the-top, but when everything was done and over, it somehow all worked. The actual visuals of the program, the various POV shots of the characters as well the POV of the game (webcam, front camera) were really cool and appropriate for the film. The end credits in the style of social media posts also rounded up the feature nicely. Nerve also had an amazing soundtrack, I was Shazam-ing all of the songs. It general, it reminded me a lot of a different film with a good soundtrack, which I saw at the end of last summer – We Are Your Friends.

Both WAYR and Nerve were obviously aimed at younger audiences because they explored the topics that actually interest teenagers – EDM and Social Media. The two films also had similar soundtracks, as I’ve mentioned. I also predict that both pictures will be similarly successful – they will either bomb at the box office or do okay, but then will dominate the streaming.

Nerve and WAYR also share similarities behind the scenes – they both were made by related people. Nerve was directed by H. Joost and A. Schulman, who did the Catfish documentary. This documental feature later had a spin-off TV show on MTV, created by Nev Schulman (brother of A. Schulman) and his business partner Max Joseph. Joseph had a feature film debut last year, directing none other but We Are Your Friends. So that’s some interesting behind the scenes trivia for you.

Acting

The film had a cast of up-and-coming actors who never really stuck with audiences.

Emma Roberts, who has been around forever, played the lead Vee and did a great job. Her chemistry with Dave Franco – another actor, trying to create a career for himself without the help of his family – as Ian was amazing as well. I first encountered Roberts in the early 2000s, in a Nancy Drew film. Lately, I’ve also seen her in Palo Alto and We’re the Millers. Later this year, she will also be in Billionaire Boys Club with a bunch of other young actors. Franco popped up on my radar in 2013’s Now You See Me and 2014’s Neighbors. He also starred in both films’ sequels. Dave Franco will now go back to working in the family and will star in his brother’s films Zeroville and The Masterpiece. Afterward, he has a comedy The Little Hours coming up.

The supporting roles of a film were kinda cliche but served their purpose. Juliette Lewis played the over-protective mother. Emily Meade starred as the outgoing friend of Vee’s – Sydney, while Miles Heizer was Tommy, Vee’s friend who secretly had a crush on her. The rapper Colson “Machine Gun Kelly” Baker starred as Ty, a fellow player of Nerve and was quite an interesting character. A bit cartoonish, but entertaining nonetheless.

The film also had a cameo, which I, as a fan of Youtube, really appreciated. The filmmaker and daily vlogger Casey Neistat made a small appearance in the movie and his presence actually made sense.

All in all, Nerve was an entertaining picture, that had a surprisingly serious cautionary message. It had a great cast, interesting visuals, and a perfect pop soundtrack. I wouldn’t be surprised if the app like Nerve will be created in a near future. For now, we at least have Pokemon Go.

Rate: 4,25/5

Trailer: Nerve trailer

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