Movie review: Deadpool 2

Movie reviews

Hello!

Welcome to a review of Deadpool 2. Took me absolutely forever (4 weeks and 3 screenings) to finally write it.

IMDb summary: Foul-mouthed mutant mercenary Wade Wilson (AKA. Deadpool), brings together a team of fellow mutant rogues to protect a young boy with supernatural abilities from the brutal, time-traveling cyborg, Cable.

Writing

The Deadpool sequel was written by the same duo that wrote the first film – Rhett Reese and Paul Wernick, however, this time around, the star of the movie – Ryan Reynolds – also got a writing credit. I thought that the second film’s writing was fairly similar to the first one’s writing in that, the screenwriters took a familiar plot and packaged it in new and exciting ways. While the first film was an origin story of sorts, the sequel did the typical superhero sequel thing and took away the familiar things from the hero, taught him a lesson, and expanded the universe. And yet, while we all have seen these elements before, they still felt fresh because they were accompanied by that unique to Deadpool tone: humor, references to the real world, the 4th wall breaks, etc. The Easter Eggs were plentiful and I don’t know if any one person can actually get all of them, I certainly didn’t. The Mid-Credits scenes contained the best jokes so make sure you wait for them! (Although you have probably already seen the movie as I’m so late with this review).

And yet, while Deadpool 2 was similar to the first film in a lot of ways, it also felt different because it came across as more sincere – seriously emotional (this come from the loss and the lesson elements in the picture). It also felt very comic-book and had an ending that combined Logan’s and Doctor Strange’s 3rd acts (save a kid + play with time). Cable worked well in the story, though his first appearance felt a bit out of nowhere. In general, this picture engrained itself more into the X-Men lore but in true Deadpool fashion, did not fully commit.

Directing

David Leitch – the one half of the directing duo behind John Wick and the director of Atomic Blonde – helmed Deadpool 2 and did a spectacular job. The hand to hand combat was good and the bigger budget was well utilized on the bigger explosive action scenes. The pacing worked well too and the emotional core of the movie was also handled well. The soundtrack was fun too (what’s dubstep tho?:D).

Acting

Ryan Reynolds pulled double duty as both Wade Wilson / Deadpool and Juggernaut and was absolutely incredible. Nobody can deny that he was born to be Deadpool, not just play the role but fully embody it. Josh Brolin was amazing as Cable and topped his very recent performance as ThanosMorena Baccarin returned as Vanessa and had some neat scenes. Hunt for the Wilderpeople’s Julian Dennison joined the cast as Russell Collins / Firefist alongside another newcomer Zazie Beetz as Domino. Both of them were great and I can’t wait to see more of them in X-Force (potentially/probably). T.J. Miller (Ready Player One) also appeared in a film and in a significantly reduced role, probably because of all the legal issues that surround him. Brianna Hildebrand returned as Negasonic Teenage Warhead, while Deadpool’s BFF Colossus was again voiced by Stefan Kapičić. The movie also featured some fun cameos by Terry CrewsBill Skarsgård, Rob DelaneyBrad PittAlan Tudyk, and Matt Damon.

In short, Deadpool 2 is similar to the first film but also tops it with a stronger emotional core and more expensive action!

Rate: 4.5/5

Trailer: Deadpool 2 trailer

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5 ideas about a movie: Hunt for the Wilderpeople

Movie reviews

Good day, my dear readers!

Welcome to another film review written in an airport. This time, we are discussing a New Zeland’s flick Hunt for the Wilderpeople.

IMDb summary: A national manhunt is ordered for a rebellious kid and his foster uncle who go missing in the wild New Zealand bush.

  1. Hunt for the Wilderpoeple was the first picture from New Zealand that I have seen (Lord of the Rings does not count), so it acted as my introduction to the whole cinema scene of the country. And, let me tell you, as introductions go, this one was not bad, not bad at all. The film was written and directed by Taika Waititi, who has made a couple of critically acclaimed movies and who has been getting a lot of media attention for being chosen to direct the 3rd Thor film for Marvel. He has also been having a lot of fun with this gig on twitter, posting photos and funny bits from the set, thus, earning the love of fans as well.
  2. Waititi’s writing for Hunt for the Wilderpeople was quite nice. I loved how he approached the format of a coming of age story: he managed to make it simultaneously very traditional looking (with the chapter structure) and also very modern (with the ideas on family, how it can be chosen instead or being born into). I also enjoyed the fact that this movie was very down to earth: the drama, as well as the comedy, arose from the daily lives of the rural people. The idea to use haikus to express the characters’ feelings was excellent and unique too. The main character’s references to various films, like Scarface and Terminator, were welcomed too. Lastly, the heartwarming ending was just such a nice way to close this story.
  3. Waititi’s directing was also great. His filmmaking style involved a lot of visual comedy, similar to Edgar Wright’s style. The comedy was very snappy and quick but also kinda violent. I also liked the fact that Waititi managed to portray a single concept from a few different angles with drastically different outcomes. For example, the first montage with a boar was a pure comedy (even if a bit disturbing), while the second one was much more brutal and drama-like. There were also quite a few other montages, which were used both for comedy purposes and to show the passage of time in the narrative.
  4. Hunt for the Wilderpoeple’s forest and bush survival parts were reminiscent of two other recent pictures – Captain Fantastic and The Lobster (might want to check them out if you liked this one). However, only Hunt had the amazing sweeping shots of the New Zealand’s forests – they were an amazing sight to behold and felt like refreshing breaks in a film, jam-packed with fast-paced montages. In addition, Waititi’s magnificent visuals were accompanied by a superb soundtrack by Lukasz Buda, Samuel Scott, and Conrad Wedde. I loved all the combinations of the visuals and the sounds, like the sacral tunes and rural views and the almost Hollywood-like action film chase sequence supplemented with techno music.
  5. Hunt for the Wilderpeople had a very talented cast as well: Sam Neill (who I didn’t recognize even though Jurassic Park is my favorite film) starred as the grumpy uncle Hec and did a neat job. Rima Te Wiata as the aunt Bella made an impact even if she only had a few scenes, while Rachel House’s Paula, a child welfare worker, was brilliantly funny. Julian Dennison was also amazing as Ricky. He made the somewhat annoying character into an actually likable and well-rounded person.

In short, Hunt for the Wilderpeople was a great endearing and quirky picture from New Zealand. It had a unique story, amazing directing from a future Marvel star (hopefully), and an excellent soundtrack.

Rate: 4.25/5

Trailer: Hunt for the Wilderpeople trailer

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